Blog fullwidth

Find out more about our press, Whistler and more

dalmation 1

The Georgia Straight | Drink of the week: The Dalmatian

14Feb

The Georgia Straight | Drink of the week: The Dalmatian

by Gail Johnson

Excerpt:

“With ski season in full swing, this week’s cocktail comes from Whistler—specifically, the village’s Pangea Pod Hotel. Created by food and beverage director Matt Scott and manager Raul Bautista Campos, the Dalmatian is a drink that the two say “shouldn’t work but does”. Perfect for après-ski.”

Read More | Source

pique

Pique Newsmagazine | Survey takes a look at preferences in eating out

11Feb

Pique Newsmagazine | Survey takes a look at preferences in eating out

by Fiona Scrivens

Excerpt:

“Despite the survey’s findings, Whistler’s Pangea Pod Hotel owner Russell Kling tries not to focus on social media for his restaurant.

“(Social media) is a very small portion of our business,” said Kling. “I’m guessing, but I would say that 99.99 per cent of our business is repeat customers or word of mouth.”

The survey also revealed that the generation-X age group is more willing to speak up about any concerns they have to a manager while those who are 55 years old and over are more likely to compliment good service.”

Read More | Source

skicanada

Ski Canada | Hip High Altitude Homey Hostel/Hotel Hybrids

04Feb

Ski Canada | Hip High Altitude Homey Hostel/Hotel Hybrids

by Louise Hudson

Excerpt:

“The smallest slopeside sanctuary around is probably Canada’s first pod hostel-hotel, the Pangea Pod at Whistler Blackcomb which opened last season. The marketing says: While guests have their own teensy territory to relax and sleep in, everything else is shared. “This ‘chic shared’ concept is changing the face of the travel industry in North America, and is setting a trend towards alternative accommodation worldwide,” says Pangea Pod’s Kristina Matisic.”

Read More | Source

ski guru

The-Ski-Guru | Wanting to Ski in Whistler but on a Budget? Why not stay at the Pangea Pod Hotel?

04Feb

The-Ski-Guru | Wanting to Ski in Whistler but on a Budget? Why not stay at the Pangea Pod Hotel?

by The-Ski-Guru

Excerpt:

“But Pangea isn’t only about the pods; it offers superb shared spaces too. The Living Room, a stylish combo of lounge, bar, café, and espresso bar, boasts floor-to-ceiling windows that overlook the bustle of Whistler’s Village Stroll, giving the space the feeling of an outdoor patio. The Rooftop Patio is Whistler’s only true rooftop bar, providing a bird’s eye view of Mountain Square. And The Toy Box, an open-plan secure storage area for skis, snowboards, mountain bikes, and other gear, was custom created to address the needs of equipment-laden outdoor enthusiasts.”

Read More | Source

1 2

The Insider’s Guide to Skiing Whistler

28Jan

As with full-time ski resort residents the world over, Whistler locals are none too keen to share the insights of their beloved mountains. But hey… it won’t be the first time we’ve broken the rules, so here we share some of our top tips for skiing Whistler Blackcomb. Consider it another gift to you, just like our convention-breaking rates.

WHERE AND WHEN TO SHRED.

  1. Glorious powder – that’s what we’re all here for, right? Symphony, Harmony and The Peak on Whistler, and Seventh Heaven, Crystal and Glacier Express on Blackcomb are the chairlifts to look for to access the best terrain.
  2. If you’re looking for sunny runs, your best bet is to head up Whistler mountain in the morning and Blackcomb in the afternoon/evening. Or just ride the Seventh Heaven chairlift (on Blackcomb) all day long – it’s called that for a reason… Of course, that’s if the big ball of fire is around at all.
  3. Advanced skiers/boarders should head to the alpine area accessible by the Glacier Express and Seventh Heaven chairlifts on Blackcomb and The Peak and Harmony chairlifts on Whistler. This is where you’ll find the most challenging terrain.
  4. Not a lot of people are aware of this, but if you’re a complete newbie (or, in Whistler lingo, “never nevers”), there’s a significantly cheaper pass that gives you access just to the initiation terrain. It’s totally worth saving dollars if you’re not going to making full use of the slopes anyway. There’s not much information about it online (for good reason – they don’t want you to know about it) – just visit the lift ticket window for details.
  5. Plan your adventures on weekdays if you have the chance. Fewer crowds means more riding, fresh powder and even better rates at Pangea.

AVOID THE CROWDS.

  1. If you’re thinking of taking a lunch break at The Roundhouse on Whistler or Rendezvous on Blackcomb, avoid doing so between 11:30 AM and 1:30 PM. Waiting around for a table is the best way to waste precious time. Heading back down to the village for lunch, on the other hand, will save you both time and dollars. Remember, the best pizzas (and sandwiches and salads) in town are just a few steps from the gondola (that’s Pangea’s The Living Room, of course!).
  2. Lifts busier than you’re willing to accept? Check out Garbanzo chairlift on Whistler and Excelerator on Blackcomb – both tend to be ignored by the crowds and give you access to great skiing terrain.
  3. Many people like to go out of bounds in pursuit of fresh powder. If you’re a high level skier/rider and that’s what you want to do, make sure you’re accompanied by someone who knows the area. Better yet check if one of Pangea’s shredhead managers are heading up for a morning of riding and ask to join them! Following random tracks can be very dangerous.

DEALING WITH THE WEATHER.

  1. Don’t let rain in the village dampen your spirits. Rain down low generally means snow up high…
  2. If you don’t love the snow conditions where you are on the mountain, try going higher or lower. With the amount of vertical Whistler Blackcomb has, the snow can change dramatically.
  3. This is Canada. It’s f@$king cold. Whistler locals know that a couple of hand/toe warmers can really fix your day, especially if you plan to be up on the mountain for a long time. These can be purchased from The Shop at reception in Pangea (and they’re about half the price here as they are on the mountain).

MAXIMIZING YOUR SKI TIME.

  1. Keep in mind that getting to Symphony Bowl takes some time, so don’t leave it for the end of the day. By the time you get there you might find it closed.
  2. Get up early, eat breakfast at Pangea, and be at the lift line 15 minutes before the official opening time. The lifts open practically every day at least 15 minutes before the published opening time – that’s something only the locals know (and like to keep to themselves). Consider yourself a local now.
  3. Take the lift after it’s officially closed. Confused?… Again, nearly every day all the chair lifts will run a 15-minute “grace period” after the official closing time. So when the liftie tells you “last chair”, well, try your luck. You can nearly always get another run in. And again, it’ll be just you and the locals out, desperately trying to keep that secret.  Shhh… (Note: the gondolas only run a 5-minute “grace period”, so plan accordingly.)

Stay tuned to our blog and social media channels for more insight and more tips and tricks to experiencing the best of the unique mountain town of Whistler on a budget.

Sign up for our Newsletter
Read our Blog 
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Instagram
Follow us on Twitter

skimag

SKI Magazine | Whistler’s First Pod Hotel Is Important for Skiers Everywhere

24Jan

SKI Magazine | Whistler’s First Pod Hotel Is Important for Skiers Everywhere

by Jon Jay

Excerpt:

“Considering rates can be as low at $50 CAD a night, it’s easily the most inexpensive stay in Whistler Village. With a bed to sleep in, a fantastic restaurant in the common area—known as The Living Room—on the second floor, and ample secured gear storage, the Pangea Pod hotel has everything a skier needs to sleep, eat, get out into the mountains, and repeat. After all, people don’t go to places like Whistler Blackcomb to spend all day in a hotel room, no matter how big or small it might be.”

Read More | Source

globe and mail balance

The Globe and Mail | Finding work-life balance when your business partner is your spouse

23Jan

The Globe and Mail | Finding work-life balance when your business partner is your spouse

by Russell Kling

Excerpt:

“To anyone considering starting a business with their partner, I would say that it’s important to have some boundaries you both agree on from the outset. I can only imagine how much more difficult starting a business would have been had my wife and I not done this. Right from the beginning, we defined what our roles and objectives would be and while we gave (and sought) each other’s opinion and work on virtually everything together, we always respected each other’s decisions.”

Read More | Source